Com-Note – Composer’s Notebook

Com-Note - Composer's Notebook

Com-Note – Composer’s Notebook

The composition of music is a complex, creative and collaborative act. This is currently done with a range of tools including the editing of musical notation, the playing, recording and playback of musical phrases, and their verbal discussion. In this project we will bring these activities together in a single ‘composer’s notebook’ app called Com-Note for a smart phone. This will be based on the trial and extension of an existing multimedia narrative app called Com-Phone, during the creation of a new work by Tom Armstrong for trumpet and string quartet. Com-Phone was created on the Community Generated Media project and is part of the Com-Me toolkit.

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Existing music composition software focuses on mixing entire compositions on a desktop or laptop computer. This shifts the locus of composition to a particular place or machine, and fails to capture the spontaneous, distributed and collaborative nature of composition and its relation to performance. Our approach is mobile, flexible and collaborative by design, and more in the spirit of a sketchbook than a mixing desk. Musical ‘sketches’, inspirations and ideas will be recordable piecemeal on a smartphone, and passed between the composer and performer for mutual consideration, extension and revision.

The project was a collaboration between the University of Surrey, the trumpet player Simon Desbruslais and the Ligeti Quartet. It was funded by the EPSRC MILES programme at Surrey under grant number EP/I000992/1.

Sally Potter Archive

Sally Potter Archive

Sally Potter Archive

Integration of the FreeEye browsing interface and design of the Sally Potter Archive at SP-ARK.org.
SP-ARK is an interactive online project based on the multi-media archive of film-maker Sally Potter.
A unique educational resource, SP-ARK is designed to enhance your access to, and knowledge of, film and filmmaking, whatever your interests.
By telling the story of a film by showing every aspect of the production –from the initial idea through screenwriting, budgeting and casting to the composition of an individual shot – SP-ARK invites you to become part of a new generation of film scholars and viewers who understand film inside out.

Here is the timed presentation of the knowledge transfer projects related to development of SP-ARK.org.

TVCAM: COM-CAM

Com-Cam

Com-Cam

It is well-known that photo, video and web content on a mobile phone is difficult to share with a group in settings where there is no other digital technology to upload it to. Yet, these settings may have existing analogue televisions that could be used as public displays. By filming the screen itself from an overhead camera and taking a sound feed from the headphone socket of the phone, Com-Cam is a low cost device for relaying the screen and sound of a mobile phone to an analogue television. Cables from Com-Cam plug into the scart or audio-visual sockets of a TV switched to its AV input channel setting. A number of different versions for the device have been tried. The best one includes an adjustable “lamp-like” structure with a whiteboard or chalkboard base. The overhead camera is in the head of the lamp-like device which can be manually focussed, and moved up or down over the screen of any mobile phone which sits underneath. The mobile phone controls are left accessible while relaying the screen image at an appropriate scale to fill the TV screen.

The overhead camera also supports the use of Com-Cam as a whiteboard and overhead projector for making group
presentations on a TV. Writing or sketching on the whiteboard or chalkboard base appears on the TV screen. Usefully this
can also be done on paper for quick removal and replacement. Additionally, printed documents and other objects and materials can also be placed on the base for presentation on the TV screen, as with an overhead projector. Com-Cam has a built-in microphone which can be switched on in these situations for amplifying the speakers’ comments through the TV speakers. The electronic components of the device are readily available off the shelf in most countries and cost about £10. Our design shows how these components can be mounted on a simple lampstand made out of local materials such as boxes and rulers.

3D video analysis

Interaction with 3D video content

Interaction with 3D video content

One of the main emerging challenges of future multimedia platforms is the development of three-dimensional (3D) display technology, resulting in a plethora of research activities in the video research community focusing on this topic. This emerging technology is capable of bringing a whole new experience to the end user by offering a 3D real immersive feeling experience. However, research towards meaningful user interaction with the real 3D content is still at its early stages.
Having this in mind, the main aim of this research activity is to provide a comprehensive understanding and investigation about how to develop an interactive 3D video platform that delivers intuitive interaction with 3D video content. The key elements of the proposed platform include effective interaction with the content and the design of appropriate UI modality. Moreover, in order to specify the requirement for the designs, a number of studies into the implication of the 3D content delivery mechanism as well as the best user practices are being conducted.

FreeEye photo and video browsing interface

FreeEye browsing interface

FreeEye browsing interface

Intuitive interfaces have become increasingly important multimedia applications, from personal photo collection to professional management systems. This research brings a novel intuitive interactive interface for browsing of large image and video collections that visualizes underlying structure of the dataset by its size and spatial relations. In order to achieve this, images/frames are initially clustered using an unsupervised graph-based clustering algorithm. By selecting images in a hierarchical layout of the screen, user can intuitively navigate through the collection. The experimental results demonstrate a significant speed-up in a content search scenario compared to a standard browsing interface, as well as inherent intuitiveness of the system.